Pious Faults

Pious Faults | Pious Faults | 3hive.com

Pious Faults | Pious Faults | 3hive.com

Brisbane band, Pious Faults, play an ear drum melting, brand of hardcore punk that’s highly recommended for any fans of the early Dischord days. Their six song, five and a half minute, self-titled cassette (out on Tenth Court Records) will pummel your ears and leave you wanting for more.

Jim And The French Vanilla

Jim And The French Vanilla | Afraid of The House | 3hive.com

Jim And The French Vanilla | Afraid of The House | 3hive.com

I’m a big fan of The Blind Shake, when I found out that Jim Blaha had another another band – Jim And The French Vanilla – I was all ears. Turns out, this is Jim’s 3rd release under the Jim And The French Vanilla moniker, his previous two releases were solo, acoustic efforts that were super limited and released on CDR.  For this new album, Afraid of The House, Jim recruited his brother (also in Blind Shake) Mike Blaha, and together they’ve turned out a 26 minute beat down of blistering, scuzzy, garage rock goodness. Give “When You’re Down” and “Eye For An Eye” (below) a spin. Enjoy.

[We have Afraid of The House on beautiful black vinyl – in the 3hive Co-op Shop, while supplies last.]

Ty Segall

Ty Segall | Ty Segall (2017) | 3hive.com

Prolific singer/songwriter Ty Segall released his 9th full length album earlier this year, with the help of usual suspects (his live band) Emmett Kelly, Mikal Cronin and Charles Moothart playing behind him.

As on previous releases, Ty and his guitar are king, as he shreds through tracks like ‘Break A Guitar’, ‘The Only One’ and ‘Thank You Mr. K’. There is plenty of jangle, and pop on this bad boy as well, like on ‘Orange Color Queen’, included (below) for your downloading/listening pleasure – build a mixtape with it, I dare you.

This is Segall’s strongest effort to date, definitely worthy of your time. Enjoy.

[We have Ty Segall’s S/T new release – in the 3hive Co-op Shop, while supplies last.]

Ty Segall – Orange Color Queen from S/T (2017)

Tall Tall Trees

Tall Tall Trees | Freedays | 3hive.com

Tall Tall Trees | Freedays | 3hive.com
To record his third album as Tall Tall Trees, Mike Savino packed up and left NYC to be the sole caretaker of an abandoned retreat deep in the national forests of northern Georgia. So it essentially became a solo (meaning, isolated) effort. As you’d guess, his surroundings inspired a certain sound. Yet, while there is plenty of introspection in the lyrics, Savino’s music is by no means quiet. In fact, it’s a dynamic blend of masterful banjo, soaring vocals, and effects wizardry.

[Buy Freedays on pristine white vinyl in the 3hive Co-op Shop. While supplies last.]

Easy Love

Easy Love | Easy Love | 3hive.com

Easy Love | Easy Love | 3hive.com

Easy Love is the solo project of Justine Brown, who is also half of the indie-pop duo Summer Twins – the band she shares with her sister Chelsea.

Justine wrote all the songs, played all the instruments, and recorded most of the songs in her bedroom. The results are an intimate, 9 songs of pop rock gold. For a taste, check out the shimmery, jangle-pop goodness of standout track “I Want You To Know”, which is below for your listening/downloading pleasure.

Easy Love is available now on cassette from Burger Records / Lolipop Records, and digitally on Bandcamp as well.

Easy Love – I Want You To Know from Easy Love (2017)

Molly Burch

Molly Burch | Please Be Mine | 3hive.com

Molly Burch’s debut LP, Please Be Mine, is an early favorite of mine for album of the year. It’s 10 tracks of reverb-soaked, country-psych twang, along with Burch’s strong, smoky vocals, sets the bar high for the rest of 2017’s releases.

Please Be Mine is available now via Captured Tracks. Please give album standouts “Downhearted” and “Try” a spin (below). You will be glad that you did. Enjoy.

[We have Please Be Mine on vinyl – in the 3hive Co-op Shop, while supplies last.]

Molly Burch FB

Grandaddy

Grandaddy | Last Place | 3hive.com

Grandaddy | Last Place | 3hive.comModesto’s finest are back! I don’t know what it says about me or, more to the point, the times we are living in but I’ve been waiting for this album like my sanity depended on it. And now I know why…

As Last Place opens, you hear Jason Lytle warming up the beloved analog Grandaddy machine – analog hum, sample burps and all – and then things kick into the single “Way We Won’t”. Everything sounds so perfect and familiar that I almost can’t remember when they hung it up (okay, it’s been 10 year and 10 months, but whatever).

For as Grandaddy as they sound, this album clearly belongs in the present day. Lytle’s nasal falsetto, scuzzy guitar, and soaring vintage synths – layered with slacker harmonies and carefully included “mistakes” – remind me of everything I love about these guys. But I don’t feel nostalgic because there’s nothing less relevant about Lytle’s love/hate relationship with the connected age, suburban bubbles, worldly vices – and the distance they place between humans and themselves/nature.

As satisfying as those tracks are, Grandaddy’s most beautiful moments have always been the love songs. My favorite line from “This Is the Part” – “where there was love, now there’s some other stuff” – rings so true it makes me want to cry. Lytle is an everyman poet whose slacker persona (dude was wearing a beard and trucker hat before most scenesters were even born) belies his earnest and complex songwriting. Don’t be fooled – Grandaddy are a national treasure.

It’s been reported that Danger Mouse coaxed the band out of retirement by both producing and releasing Last Place on his 30th Century Records imprint. While that’s been in the back of my head as I listen, I can’t make out his fingerprints. DM’s a Grandaddy fanboy, so perhaps he took a step back and cheered them on as the band picked up from their highest pre-hiatus point. Or maybe the collaboration was so seamless that it sounds too natural to notice. To be honest – I just care that this record exists.

[We have some Grandaddy vinyl – including Last Place on brown vinyl – in the 3hive Co-op Shop, while supplies last.]

Marie Mathématique

Marie Mathématique | Tous vos lendemains dès aujourd'hui | 3hive.com

French psych-poppers, Marie Mathématique, come to you courtesy of Six Tonnes De Chair’s Instagram feed. When I saw their album cover (above) on said feed, I knew it was something I needed to get my hands on – and I am so glad that I did.

Their latest album, Tous vos lendemains dès aujourd’hui (Google translated – “All Your Tomorrows Today”), came out last September via 2000 Records. It’s 33 minutes of swirling guitars, fuzzy synths and a massive, pounding, rhythm section is psychedelic gold. Give “Sous mon second soleil” (below) a spin, it’s a solid example of Marie Mathématique’s goodness.

Tous vos lendemains dès aujourd’hui is available on vinyl and digitally through 2000 Records. Enjoy!

Marie Mathématique – Sous mon second soleil from Tous vos lendemains dès aujourd’hui (2016)

The Courtneys

The Courtneys | II | 3hive.com

The Courtneys | II | 3hive.com
When I saw Todd’s 2014 post about The Courtneys’ “Mars Attacks” single was trending I realized people are probably looking for our take on their sophomore album II, which dropped a couple weeks ago. So here it is: sun-drenched power pop from Vancouver, BC, that doesn’t let up on the pop culture references, hooks, and fuzzed-out guitars from beginning to end. Also worth noting: singer Jen Twynn Payne is the drummer, too! – a sorta Grant Hart meets Karen Carpenter. Spin the Courtneys and make summer happen early this year.

Slowcoaches

Slowcoaches | Nothing Gives | 3hive.com

I spend the first part of every year going through my routine of researching music from the previous year that I’d somehow been sleeping on. 2017’s biggest wake-up so far has been Nothing Gives by London’s Slowcoaches. This blistering debut – which in my defense was released in early December – has all the right triggers if you’re nostalgic for ’90s bands like Babes in Toyland or L7: chunky hooks, start-stomp tempos, that indifferent sneer…

However, I haven’t been pining for that sound at all. So why was I so drawn in by “We’re So Heavy” when it showed up in the pole position on my Discover Weekly playlist? One superficial explanation could be the Anglophile appeal. Elastica plagiarized Wire almost note-for-note but somehow got a hall pass from me while I remember wandering off to find a snack during Babes in Toyland’s Lollapalooza set back in ’93.

The real answer – for me, at least – lies in the cloaked intimacy of singer/bassist Heather Perkins’ lyrics, which she slyly tucks between punches of fuzzed-out guitar and angsty anthemic choruses. There, Perkins cops to her anxieties, and their consequences, with a realness that is both exhilarating and heartbreaking. On “Raw Dealings” she sings, “I’ve been struggling with distance every time/You’re all out of time, you’re all out of time”. She’s indicting herself and setting herself free in the same breath. The album is full of these subtle moments that make their fierce outer trappings even more meaningful. Don’t sleep, even for a minute, on this lot.